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Why Kenyan economy is doing very well. Informal survey
MugundaMan
#1 Posted : Friday, January 04, 2019 1:22:33 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 1/8/2018
Posts: 1,348
Location: DC (Dustbowl County)
Sitting here in this nice upscale coffee house in DC (dust bowl county i. e. Kajiado County for those still in the dark), sipping my mocha and surfing the free Wi-Fi fuaaaaa I cannot help but see that the Kenyan economy is definitely on the boom and here is the reason why.

First of all this place is packed to capacity. Hata seating space is so limited that for the first time ever I am forced to share a booth with three other youngsters. The place is filled with prosperous looking yuppies spending big. All are tech wired, with gleaming smart phones being swiped away and laptops with incubator logos on them. This place is no different from Lavington or TRM or any other place where the middle classes like to gather to exchange ideas, work on things or just unwind in between earning and living.

Ten to 15 years ago this was not the case. A coffee house like this would not be found in dust bowl. All you would find is dilapidated dusty buildings and little else. Now world class glitzy malls are opening like horses bolting for a lucrative finish line. Sijui Kitengela Mall, sijui Signature Mall, sijui Crystal Rivers Mall and several more. But back to my table...

The sharply dressed baby faced youngsters in my booth look no older than 23-25 years old. They are speaking Greek IMHO...rapid fire talk about coding and algorithms and other tech fare that make the computer classes I took in first year uni seem obsolete. Their voices are animated and excited with boundless confidence and optimism. No politics here. Just taking their destiny into their own hands.

The swelling middle classes of Kenya are now untamed and there is no holding them back. The numbers don't lie. Domestic tourism cannot be contained any more. Hotels are full, Bonfire adventures and other companies have made Croesus like fortunes and won global awards from catering to the needs of the sprawling middle classes.

In the real estate industry, the clientele is getting younger and younger each year. Gone are the days when homes and plots were sold only to doddering old tea and coffee bonus farmers. I went to a site a few months ago and found a comically young guy putting final touches to his beautiful maisonette in the ClayWorks area. His occupation? A content producer for a local media company. These guys are Kenya's future.

Even among the lower middle classes and below, the changes -albeit slow - have been remarkable as the middle class rising tide lifts all boats. They are better clothed, better fed and better housed. The place I stay for example has a gardener who moonlights by washing cars for the residents for 200 Bob a pop. I counted the other day and based on the number of cars he washes, he easily scrapes about 3000 a day net, 7 days a week.

Is it any wonder then that he is building a modest bungalow in Rongai? What about hawkers? Those guys are doing very well for themselves. What about flower and tree sellers by the roadside. I once dropped about 2k picking up plants and flowers from a chap on a major highway in Nairobi. Imagine my shock when he pulled out a thick bunda of notes from his pocket while giving me change. Kenyans of all classes who are enterprising and are not waiting for a handout are all getting ahead at rapid clip.

This is what inspires confidence in the future of the economy despite the small challenges here and there that all nations on earth face, and the GDP growth numbers corroborate this.

As I take my last sip of mocha getting ready to leave, the Greek on my table continues. The coffee shop is still packed to capacity. The aroma of freshly baked cakes, coffee, chapati and avocado salads waft deliciously in the air. We have a beautiful country, my friends. Let's put in the work and the future is ours.

Shalom.
"The best investment on earth is earth"
Life is Sweet and Jesus is Lord
sparkly
#2 Posted : Friday, January 04, 2019 6:02:56 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 9/23/2009
Posts: 6,552
Location: Enk are Nyirobi
MugundaMan wrote:
Sitting here in this nice upscale coffee house in DC (dust bowl county i. e. Kajiado County for those still in the dark), sipping my mocha and surfing the free Wi-Fi fuaaaaa I cannot help but see that the Kenyan economy is definitely on the boom and here is the reason why.

First of all this place is packed to capacity. Hata seating space is so limited that for the first time ever I am forced to share a booth with three other youngsters. The place is filled with prosperous looking yuppies spending big. All are tech wired, with gleaming smart phones being swiped away and laptops with incubator logos on them. This place is no different from Lavington or TRM or any other place where the middle classes like to gather to exchange ideas, work on things or just unwind in between earning and living.

Ten to 15 years ago this was not the case. A coffee house like this would not be found in dust bowl. All you would find is dilapidated dusty buildings and little else. Now world class glitzy malls are opening like horses bolting for a lucrative finish line. Sijui Kitengela Mall, sijui signature mall and several more. But back to my table.

The sharply dressed baby faced youngsters in my booth look no older than 23-25 years old. They are speaking Greek IMHO...rapid fire talk about coding and algorithms and other tech fare that make the compute classes I took in first year uni seem obsolete. Their voices are animated and excited with boundless confidence and optimism. No politics here. Just taking their destiny into their own hands.

The swelling middle classes of Kenya are now untamed and there is no holding them back. The numbers don't lie. Domestic tourism cannot be contained any more. Hotels are full, Bonfire adventures and other companies have made Croesus like fortunes and won global awards from catering to the needs of the sprawling middle classes.

In the real estate industry, the clientele is getting younger and younger each year. Gone are the days when homes and plots were sold only to doddering old tea and coffee bonus farmers. I went to a site a few months ago and found a comically young guy putting final touches to his beautiful maisonette in the ClayWorks area. His occupation? A content producer for a local media company. These guys are Kenya's future.

Even among the lower middle classes and below, the changes -albeit slow - have been remarkable as the middle class rising tide lifts all boats. They are better clothed, better fed and better housed. The place I stay for example has a gardener who moonlights by washing cars for the residents for 200 Bob a pop. I counted the other day and based on the number of cars he washes, he easily scrapes about 3000 a day net, 7 days a week.

Is it any wonder then that he is building a modest bungalow in Rongai? What about hawkers? Those guys are doing very well for themselves. What about flower and tree sellers by the roadside. I once dropped about 2k picking up plants and flowers from a chap on a major highway in Nairobi. Imagine my shock when he pulled out a thick bunda of notes from his pocket while giving me change. Kenyans of all classes who are enterprising and are not waiting for a handout are all getting ahead at rapid clip.

This is what inspires confidence in the future of the economy despite the small challenges here and there that all nations on earth face, and the GDP growth numbers corroborate this.

As I take my last sip of mocha getting ready to leave, the Greek on my table continues. The coffee shop is still lacked to capacity. The aroma of freshly baked cakes, coffee, chapati and avocado salads waft deliciously in the air. We have a beautiful country, my friends. Let's put in the work and the future is ours.

Shalom.


Cool narrative, good encouragement.
Life is short. Live passionately.
Chaka
#3 Posted : Friday, January 04, 2019 9:04:23 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 2/16/2007
Posts: 2,024
@Mugundaman, you should have posted some pics? Guys might say you were dreaming...
rwitre
#4 Posted : Friday, January 04, 2019 9:37:52 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 3/8/2018
Posts: 210
Location: Nairobi
sparkly wrote:
MugundaMan wrote:
Sitting here in this nice upscale coffee house in DC (dust bowl county i. e. Kajiado County for those still in the dark), sipping my mocha and surfing the free Wi-Fi fuaaaaa I cannot help but see that the Kenyan economy is definitely on the boom and here is the reason why.

First of all this place is packed to capacity. Hata seating space is so limited that for the first time ever I am forced to share a booth with three other youngsters. The place is filled with prosperous looking yuppies spending big. All are tech wired, with gleaming smart phones being swiped away and laptops with incubator logos on them. This place is no different from Lavington or TRM or any other place where the middle classes like to gather to exchange ideas, work on things or just unwind in between earning and living.

Ten to 15 years ago this was not the case. A coffee house like this would not be found in dust bowl. All you would find is dilapidated dusty buildings and little else. Now world class glitzy malls are opening like horses bolting for a lucrative finish line. Sijui Kitengela Mall, sijui signature mall and several more. But back to my table.

The sharply dressed baby faced youngsters in my booth look no older than 23-25 years old. They are speaking Greek IMHO...rapid fire talk about coding and algorithms and other tech fare that make the compute classes I took in first year uni seem obsolete. Their voices are animated and excited with boundless confidence and optimism. No politics here. Just taking their destiny into their own hands.

The swelling middle classes of Kenya are now untamed and there is no holding them back. The numbers don't lie. Domestic tourism cannot be contained any more. Hotels are full, Bonfire adventures and other companies have made Croesus like fortunes and won global awards from catering to the needs of the sprawling middle classes.

In the real estate industry, the clientele is getting younger and younger each year. Gone are the days when homes and plots were sold only to doddering old tea and coffee bonus farmers. I went to a site a few months ago and found a comically young guy putting final touches to his beautiful maisonette in the ClayWorks area. His occupation? A content producer for a local media company. These guys are Kenya's future.

Even among the lower middle classes and below, the changes -albeit slow - have been remarkable as the middle class rising tide lifts all boats. They are better clothed, better fed and better housed. The place I stay for example has a gardener who moonlights by washing cars for the residents for 200 Bob a pop. I counted the other day and based on the number of cars he washes, he easily scrapes about 3000 a day net, 7 days a week.

Is it any wonder then that he is building a modest bungalow in Rongai? What about hawkers? Those guys are doing very well for themselves. What about flower and tree sellers by the roadside. I once dropped about 2k picking up plants and flowers from a chap on a major highway in Nairobi. Imagine my shock when he pulled out a thick bunda of notes from his pocket while giving me change. Kenyans of all classes who are enterprising and are not waiting for a handout are all getting ahead at rapid clip.

This is what inspires confidence in the future of the economy despite the small challenges here and there that all nations on earth face, and the GDP growth numbers corroborate this.

As I take my last sip of mocha getting ready to leave, the Greek on my table continues. The coffee shop is still lacked to capacity. The aroma of freshly baked cakes, coffee, chapati and avocado salads waft deliciously in the air. We have a beautiful country, my friends. Let's put in the work and the future is ours.

Shalom.


Cool narrative, good encouragement.


Taxman is racking his brain wondering how to get to that flower guy Laughing out loudly
Metch
#5 Posted : Saturday, January 05, 2019 10:43:30 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 12/22/2015
Posts: 135
Location: Mombasa, Kenya
rwitre wrote:
sparkly wrote:
MugundaMan wrote:
Sitting here in this nice upscale coffee house in DC (dust bowl county i. e. Kajiado County for those still in the dark), sipping my mocha and surfing the free Wi-Fi fuaaaaa I cannot help but see that the Kenyan economy is definitely on the boom and here is the reason why.

First of all this place is packed to capacity. Hata seating space is so limited that for the first time ever I am forced to share a booth with three other youngsters. The place is filled with prosperous looking yuppies spending big. All are tech wired, with gleaming smart phones being swiped away and laptops with incubator logos on them. This place is no different from Lavington or TRM or any other place where the middle classes like to gather to exchange ideas, work on things or just unwind in between earning and living.

Ten to 15 years ago this was not the case. A coffee house like this would not be found in dust bowl. All you would find is dilapidated dusty buildings and little else. Now world class glitzy malls are opening like horses bolting for a lucrative finish line. Sijui Kitengela Mall, sijui signature mall and several more. But back to my table.

The sharply dressed baby faced youngsters in my booth look no older than 23-25 years old. They are speaking Greek IMHO...rapid fire talk about coding and algorithms and other tech fare that make the compute classes I took in first year uni seem obsolete. Their voices are animated and excited with boundless confidence and optimism. No politics here. Just taking their destiny into their own hands.

The swelling middle classes of Kenya are now untamed and there is no holding them back. The numbers don't lie. Domestic tourism cannot be contained any more. Hotels are full, Bonfire adventures and other companies have made Croesus like fortunes and won global awards from catering to the needs of the sprawling middle classes.

In the real estate industry, the clientele is getting younger and younger each year. Gone are the days when homes and plots were sold only to doddering old tea and coffee bonus farmers. I went to a site a few months ago and found a comically young guy putting final touches to his beautiful maisonette in the ClayWorks area. His occupation? A content producer for a local media company. These guys are Kenya's future.

Even among the lower middle classes and below, the changes -albeit slow - have been remarkable as the middle class rising tide lifts all boats. They are better clothed, better fed and better housed. The place I stay for example has a gardener who moonlights by washing cars for the residents for 200 Bob a pop. I counted the other day and based on the number of cars he washes, he easily scrapes about 3000 a day net, 7 days a week.

Is it any wonder then that he is building a modest bungalow in Rongai? What about hawkers? Those guys are doing very well for themselves. What about flower and tree sellers by the roadside. I once dropped about 2k picking up plants and flowers from a chap on a major highway in Nairobi. Imagine my shock when he pulled out a thick bunda of notes from his pocket while giving me change. Kenyans of all classes who are enterprising and are not waiting for a handout are all getting ahead at rapid clip.

This is what inspires confidence in the future of the economy despite the small challenges here and there that all nations on earth face, and the GDP growth numbers corroborate this.

As I take my last sip of mocha getting ready to leave, the Greek on my table continues. The coffee shop is still lacked to capacity. The aroma of freshly baked cakes, coffee, chapati and avocado salads waft deliciously in the air. We have a beautiful country, my friends. Let's put in the work and the future is ours.

Shalom.


Cool narrative, good encouragement.


Taxman is racking his brain wondering how to get to that flower guy Laughing out loudly


This runaway consumerism by a generation that is not afraid to borrow is not an indicator of economic boom. Its like our government borrowing to finance everything- then calls it development. We are digging financial holes that our children will stumble into. Beneficiaries of this chaos are Tala, Branch, Mshwari, KCBMpesa and other well positioned shylocks. And yes, the bonfires, Javas, and fancy clubs that provide platforms to flaunt this borrowed lifestyle are making a killing
Start!
Horton
#6 Posted : Saturday, January 05, 2019 11:47:03 AM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 8/30/2007
Posts: 1,356
Location: Nairobi
Metch wrote:
rwitre wrote:
sparkly wrote:
MugundaMan wrote:
Sitting here in this nice upscale coffee house in DC (dust bowl county i. e. Kajiado County for those still in the dark), sipping my mocha and surfing the free Wi-Fi fuaaaaa I cannot help but see that the Kenyan economy is definitely on the boom and here is the reason why.

First of all this place is packed to capacity. Hata seating space is so limited that for the first time ever I am forced to share a booth with three other youngsters. The place is filled with prosperous looking yuppies spending big. All are tech wired, with gleaming smart phones being swiped away and laptops with incubator logos on them. This place is no different from Lavington or TRM or any other place where the middle classes like to gather to exchange ideas, work on things or just unwind in between earning and living.

Ten to 15 years ago this was not the case. A coffee house like this would not be found in dust bowl. All you would find is dilapidated dusty buildings and little else. Now world class glitzy malls are opening like horses bolting for a lucrative finish line. Sijui Kitengela Mall, sijui signature mall and several more. But back to my table.

The sharply dressed baby faced youngsters in my booth look no older than 23-25 years old. They are speaking Greek IMHO...rapid fire talk about coding and algorithms and other tech fare that make the compute classes I took in first year uni seem obsolete. Their voices are animated and excited with boundless confidence and optimism. No politics here. Just taking their destiny into their own hands.

The swelling middle classes of Kenya are now untamed and there is no holding them back. The numbers don't lie. Domestic tourism cannot be contained any more. Hotels are full, Bonfire adventures and other companies have made Croesus like fortunes and won global awards from catering to the needs of the sprawling middle classes.

In the real estate industry, the clientele is getting younger and younger each year. Gone are the days when homes and plots were sold only to doddering old tea and coffee bonus farmers. I went to a site a few months ago and found a comically young guy putting final touches to his beautiful maisonette in the ClayWorks area. His occupation? A content producer for a local media company. These guys are Kenya's future.

Even among the lower middle classes and below, the changes -albeit slow - have been remarkable as the middle class rising tide lifts all boats. They are better clothed, better fed and better housed. The place I stay for example has a gardener who moonlights by washing cars for the residents for 200 Bob a pop. I counted the other day and based on the number of cars he washes, he easily scrapes about 3000 a day net, 7 days a week.

Is it any wonder then that he is building a modest bungalow in Rongai? What about hawkers? Those guys are doing very well for themselves. What about flower and tree sellers by the roadside. I once dropped about 2k picking up plants and flowers from a chap on a major highway in Nairobi. Imagine my shock when he pulled out a thick bunda of notes from his pocket while giving me change. Kenyans of all classes who are enterprising and are not waiting for a handout are all getting ahead at rapid clip.

This is what inspires confidence in the future of the economy despite the small challenges here and there that all nations on earth face, and the GDP growth numbers corroborate this.

As I take my last sip of mocha getting ready to leave, the Greek on my table continues. The coffee shop is still lacked to capacity. The aroma of freshly baked cakes, coffee, chapati and avocado salads waft deliciously in the air. We have a beautiful country, my friends. Let's put in the work and the future is ours.

Shalom.


Cool narrative, good encouragement.


Taxman is racking his brain wondering how to get to that flower guy Laughing out loudly


This runaway consumerism by a generation that is not afraid to borrow is not an indicator of economic boom. Its like our government borrowing to finance everything- then calls it development. We are digging financial holes that our children will stumble into. Beneficiaries of this chaos are Tala, Branch, Mshwari, KCBMpesa and other well positioned shylocks. And yes, the bonfires, Javas, and fancy clubs that provide platforms to flaunt this borrowed lifestyle are making a killing


1. Incase you haven’t noticed, people aren’t getting loans as readily as before. So there goes that theory of borrowed money

2. These areas are popular with airport staff, I know a lot of KQ employees live in this suburbia. So not highly unlikely what MM is saying.
I own shares in KCB,CYTONN, BRK.B, Almasi Beverages and a few other private small businesses
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