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Homeboyz Entertainment Plc
Ericsson
#21 Posted : Tuesday, December 22, 2020 11:44:47 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 12/4/2009
Posts: 9,404
Location: NAIROBI
Mike Ock wrote:
Prospectus iko pale homeboyz.co.ke

My cursory reading confirms that everything is OK here. Nothing big to report. There will obviously be a dramatic dip to almost zero revenue for this year though. This one will be worth taking a serious look at after this whole corona debacle comes to an end.


After the drop in revenue, they will come to shareholders requesting for funding through a rights issue
Wealth is built through a relatively simple equation
Wealth=Income + Investments - Lifestyle
Ali Baba
#22 Posted : Wednesday, December 23, 2020 12:31:09 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 8/29/2008
Posts: 548
Ericsson wrote:
Mike Ock wrote:
Prospectus iko pale homeboyz.co.ke

My cursory reading confirms that everything is OK here. Nothing big to report. There will obviously be a dramatic dip to almost zero revenue for this year though. This one will be worth taking a serious look at after this whole corona debacle comes to an end.


After the drop in revenue, they will come to shareholders requesting for funding through a rights issue

They have retained earnings. Don't they??
aemathenge
#23 Posted : Wednesday, December 30, 2020 12:34:23 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/18/2008
Posts: 3,391
Location: Kerugoya
Would The Business Daily Editorial Fraternity really sanction such a brutal analysis of Homeboyz Entertainment PLC?

For a public relations and advertising agency, I would love to see their rebuttal of this article.

Sample this:

Quote:
The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.


Have a look: https://www.businessdail...boyz-nse-listing-3241972
xtina
#24 Posted : Wednesday, December 30, 2020 9:13:22 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 6/26/2008
Posts: 342
[quote=aemathenge]Would The Business Daily Editorial Fraternity really sanction such a brutal analysis of Homeboyz Entertainment PLC?

For a public relations and advertising agency, I would love to see their rebuttal of this article.

Sample this:

Quote:
The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.


Have a look: https://www.businessdail...oyz-nse-listing-3241972[/quote]

Rabar brothers are to be admired for their entrepreneurial spirit but perhaps this was just ill-timed. Like the author, I too am curious why BIDCO and Chandaria Industries don't want to go public.


The trouble with Homeboyz NSE listing
TUESDAY DECEMBER 29 2020
HOMEBOYZ
Homeboyz chief executive Myke Rabar. PHOTO | SALATON NJAU | NMG


A few days ago, Homeboyz Entertainment made its debut on the Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) coming through the Growth Enterprise Market Segment (Gems) and is now known as Homeboyz Entertainment PLC.

This is a company I have been watching for years now because I have often used it to have a pulse of Kenya’s entertainment industry and the listing will in fact provide a more reflective pulse.

The Rabar brothers, no doubt, have a good story to tell about their journey pioneering the entertainment business. At the time of its listing Homeboyz is a public relations and advertising agency boasting six audio recording studios, two TV production facilities, an events management division, a full audio-visual rental and maintenance department, the Music Technology academy and roadshow gigs.

One has to give it to the Rabars for taking the risk of going public; it is a bold move, the public scrutiny, shareholder expectation and all listing turbulence that comes with it is not for the faint-hearted.

But was going public the right choice for their company to unlock capital and value?

First, the company is not corporatised enough, it is family-owned and family-run. The three Rabar family members are the shareholders, at the same time board directors, and the three also lead the management.

In a board where three out of five directors are Rabars, they have the majority voting power, giving them tight control of the company. The NSE consultants should have advised them to diversify their board with names that bring corporate governance experience.

That would give the company public confidence that the board will make independent decisions pursuing the interest of the general shareholding and not family interest.

Second, with the family in tight control of the business, the three directors in management take home Sh30 million a year in salaries, which is 15 percent of company’s generated gross profit.

From an investor’s perspective, I would need to be heavily persuaded why I should invest in a company where management takes 15 percent of generated gross profit in salaries, bearing in mind the management has three family members.

Apart from that, something the NSE consultants missed is the political risk exposure of the company. The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.

Third, listing of the company left the transaction advisers with a bloodied nose in the price discovery. One share was priced at Sh4 but when the company went into the market, asking price was much far away from the Sh4; it was almost 90 percent less.

Statistically, if one has a deviation of 90 percent away from the target, that is simply guesswork. The value Homeboyz Entertainment was keen to unlock through listing ended up beginning with a false start.

It is safe to conclude that listing Homeboyz Entertainment was ill-timed. But the issue is not only about timing, but the crux of the matter is also the question whether listing was the best option for every company that wants to unlock capital? Looking at the regulatory requirements for publicly listed companies, from the auditing to holding AGMs, is a company that generates a gross profit of 189.4 million and a turnover of 311 million worth the listing hustle?

The fact that high-value family-owned businesses like Bidco and Comcraft owned by Manu Chandaria have not found the value of listing says a lot about our securities exchange.

I remain unconvinced that NSE’s strategy of recruiting SMEs like Homeboyz Entertainment is the way forward when companies like Bidco and Comcraft have chosen to stay away from the NSE.
Fyatu
#25 Posted : Wednesday, December 30, 2020 1:22:21 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 1/20/2011
Posts: 1,809
Location: Nakuru
xtina wrote:
[quote=aemathenge]Would The Business Daily Editorial Fraternity really sanction such a brutal analysis of Homeboyz Entertainment PLC?

For a public relations and advertising agency, I would love to see their rebuttal of this article.

Sample this:

Quote:
The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.


Have a look: https://www.businessdail...oyz-nse-listing-3241972[/quote]

Rabar brothers are to be admired for their entrepreneurial spirit but perhaps this was just ill-timed. Like the author, I too am curious why BIDCO and Chandaria Industries don't want to go public.


The trouble with Homeboyz NSE listing
TUESDAY DECEMBER 29 2020
HOMEBOYZ
Homeboyz chief executive Myke Rabar. PHOTO | SALATON NJAU | NMG


A few days ago, Homeboyz Entertainment made its debut on the Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) coming through the Growth Enterprise Market Segment (Gems) and is now known as Homeboyz Entertainment PLC.

This is a company I have been watching for years now because I have often used it to have a pulse of Kenya’s entertainment industry and the listing will in fact provide a more reflective pulse.

The Rabar brothers, no doubt, have a good story to tell about their journey pioneering the entertainment business. At the time of its listing Homeboyz is a public relations and advertising agency boasting six audio recording studios, two TV production facilities, an events management division, a full audio-visual rental and maintenance department, the Music Technology academy and roadshow gigs.

One has to give it to the Rabars for taking the risk of going public; it is a bold move, the public scrutiny, shareholder expectation and all listing turbulence that comes with it is not for the faint-hearted.

But was going public the right choice for their company to unlock capital and value?

First, the company is not corporatised enough, it is family-owned and family-run. The three Rabar family members are the shareholders, at the same time board directors, and the three also lead the management.

In a board where three out of five directors are Rabars, they have the majority voting power, giving them tight control of the company. The NSE consultants should have advised them to diversify their board with names that bring corporate governance experience.

That would give the company public confidence that the board will make independent decisions pursuing the interest of the general shareholding and not family interest.

Second, with the family in tight control of the business, the three directors in management take home Sh30 million a year in salaries, which is 15 percent of company’s generated gross profit.

From an investor’s perspective, I would need to be heavily persuaded why I should invest in a company where management takes 15 percent of generated gross profit in salaries, bearing in mind the management has three family members.

Apart from that, something the NSE consultants missed is the political risk exposure of the company. The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.

Third, listing of the company left the transaction advisers with a bloodied nose in the price discovery. One share was priced at Sh4 but when the company went into the market, asking price was much far away from the Sh4; it was almost 90 percent less.

Statistically, if one has a deviation of 90 percent away from the target, that is simply guesswork. The value Homeboyz Entertainment was keen to unlock through listing ended up beginning with a false start.

It is safe to conclude that listing Homeboyz Entertainment was ill-timed. But the issue is not only about timing, but the crux of the matter is also the question whether listing was the best option for every company that wants to unlock capital? Looking at the regulatory requirements for publicly listed companies, from the auditing to holding AGMs, is a company that generates a gross profit of 189.4 million and a turnover of 311 million worth the listing hustle?

The fact that high-value family-owned businesses like Bidco and Comcraft owned by Manu Chandaria have not found the value of listing says a lot about our securities exchange.

I remain unconvinced that NSE’s strategy of recruiting SMEs like Homeboyz Entertainment is the way forward when companies like Bidco and Comcraft have chosen to stay away from the NSE.


I have said it before that the Ibuka list is mediocre.
Dumb money becomes dumb only when it listens to smart money
Ali Baba
#26 Posted : Wednesday, December 30, 2020 2:47:37 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 8/29/2008
Posts: 548
Bidco and Chandaria do not want to list. I guess that they don't want to dilute their shareholding and some obscure laws, eg directors are supposed to retire at age 75.
Ali Baba
#27 Posted : Wednesday, December 30, 2020 4:56:08 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 8/29/2008
Posts: 548
If you are Manu Chandaria and you can't sit on the board of your company, why would you want to list? If I were him, I would not list, too.
VituVingiSana
#28 Posted : Wednesday, December 30, 2020 9:51:13 PM
Rank: Chief


Joined: 1/3/2007
Posts: 17,415
Location: Nairobi
Ali Baba wrote:
Bidco and Chandaria do not want to list. I guess that they don't want to dilute their shareholding and some obscure laws, eg directors are supposed to retire at age 75.

There are multiple reasons for listing.

Is there a need/plan to raise funds?
Do the shareholders want an exit for cash?
Does the firm want to use its shares as currency for a purchase of another firm?
Does the firm want to use its shares as currency for a merger of another firm?

For the purchase and merger, the sellers may want a listed firm so they can sell their shares. NIC-CBA comes to mind where the former shareholders of CBA can now sell their NCBA shares.

Bharat Thakrar of SCAN listed and then sold some of his shares for cash. Others he sold to WPP. Scan also "sold/exchanged" SCAN shares for some WPP firms.

BIDCO may not need cash from "investors" like us since there are many PE firms looking to offer good terms without the drama of having AGMs where some shareholders will ask for freebies/goodies.

I see that in UNGA. Even during the virtual AGM, there was a request for goodies. Laughing out loudly
Greedy when others are fearful. Very fearful when others are greedy - to paraphrase Warren Buffett
Ali Baba
#29 Posted : Thursday, December 31, 2020 10:19:22 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 8/29/2008
Posts: 548
Then we can confidently say that listing at NSE has lost its luster. Investors should stop the obsession with cheap umbrellas, sodas... Aka the culture of cheap handouts(like in electioneering) and see the bigger picture.
sparkly
#30 Posted : Friday, January 01, 2021 8:51:53 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 9/23/2009
Posts: 7,945
Location: Enk are Nyirobi
xtina wrote:
[quote=aemathenge]Would The Business Daily Editorial Fraternity really sanction such a brutal analysis of Homeboyz Entertainment PLC?

For a public relations and advertising agency, I would love to see their rebuttal of this article.

Sample this:

Quote:
The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.


Have a look: https://www.businessdail...oyz-nse-listing-3241972[/quote]

Rabar brothers are to be admired for their entrepreneurial spirit but perhaps this was just ill-timed. Like the author, I too am curious why BIDCO and Chandaria Industries don't want to go public.


The trouble with Homeboyz NSE listing
TUESDAY DECEMBER 29 2020
HOMEBOYZ
Homeboyz chief executive Myke Rabar. PHOTO | SALATON NJAU | NMG


A few days ago, Homeboyz Entertainment made its debut on the Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) coming through the Growth Enterprise Market Segment (Gems) and is now known as Homeboyz Entertainment PLC.

This is a company I have been watching for years now because I have often used it to have a pulse of Kenya’s entertainment industry and the listing will in fact provide a more reflective pulse.

The Rabar brothers, no doubt, have a good story to tell about their journey pioneering the entertainment business. At the time of its listing Homeboyz is a public relations and advertising agency boasting six audio recording studios, two TV production facilities, an events management division, a full audio-visual rental and maintenance department, the Music Technology academy and roadshow gigs.

One has to give it to the Rabars for taking the risk of going public; it is a bold move, the public scrutiny, shareholder expectation and all listing turbulence that comes with it is not for the faint-hearted.

But was going public the right choice for their company to unlock capital and value?

First, the company is not corporatised enough, it is family-owned and family-run. The three Rabar family members are the shareholders, at the same time board directors, and the three also lead the management.

In a board where three out of five directors are Rabars, they have the majority voting power, giving them tight control of the company. The NSE consultants should have advised them to diversify their board with names that bring corporate governance experience.

That would give the company public confidence that the board will make independent decisions pursuing the interest of the general shareholding and not family interest.

Second, with the family in tight control of the business, the three directors in management take home Sh30 million a year in salaries, which is 15 percent of company’s generated gross profit.

From an investor’s perspective, I would need to be heavily persuaded why I should invest in a company where management takes 15 percent of generated gross profit in salaries, bearing in mind the management has three family members.

Apart from that, something the NSE consultants missed is the political risk exposure of the company. The company lists Kenya Revenue Authority and State House as their top two clients, this means that if the company finds itself politically incorrect, it loses its top two revenue source, bringing to question the company’s sustainability.

Third, listing of the company left the transaction advisers with a bloodied nose in the price discovery. One share was priced at Sh4 but when the company went into the market, asking price was much far away from the Sh4; it was almost 90 percent less.

Statistically, if one has a deviation of 90 percent away from the target, that is simply guesswork. The value Homeboyz Entertainment was keen to unlock through listing ended up beginning with a false start.

It is safe to conclude that listing Homeboyz Entertainment was ill-timed. But the issue is not only about timing, but the crux of the matter is also the question whether listing was the best option for every company that wants to unlock capital? Looking at the regulatory requirements for publicly listed companies, from the auditing to holding AGMs, is a company that generates a gross profit of 189.4 million and a turnover of 311 million worth the listing hustle?

The fact that high-value family-owned businesses like Bidco and Comcraft owned by Manu Chandaria have not found the value of listing says a lot about our securities exchange.

I remain unconvinced that NSE’s strategy of recruiting SMEs like Homeboyz Entertainment is the way forward when companies like Bidco and Comcraft have chosen to stay away from the NSE.


The writer doesn't know the essence of Growth and Enterprise Market Segment (GEMS). GEMS is for listing small issues ie kiosks in public listing lingo.

He also doesn't understand how Indian companies are structured. Comcraft is not a single company. It is a conglomeration of family interests, spanning at least 4 generations. Such conglomerates typically have segmented investments in manufacturing, retail, banking, real estate, investments, logistics etc with different family groups owning a piece here and there. Untangling family interests to allow listing is a huge task.
Life is short. Live passionately.
VituVingiSana
#31 Posted : Saturday, January 02, 2021 8:23:25 AM
Rank: Chief


Joined: 1/3/2007
Posts: 17,415
Location: Nairobi
@Sparkly

Whereas that may be the case regarding Comcraft, there may be parts of it that could be listed.
I am not saying it makes sense for them to be listed but there is always the possibility.

What listing does offer complicated ownership structures is price discovery.

Let's say one part of Comcraft eg Comcraft Logistics (a fictional example) has multiple shareholders from different parts/generations of the family. Some want out. How do you price their shares in a "private" setting?

On the other hand, they can sell (or not) at the "market price" if listed when they want to.
Greedy when others are fearful. Very fearful when others are greedy - to paraphrase Warren Buffett
VituVingiSana
#32 Posted : Saturday, January 02, 2021 8:27:36 AM
Rank: Chief


Joined: 1/3/2007
Posts: 17,415
Location: Nairobi
Centum has stakes in bunch of firms/projects.

Just their real estate is spread between Two Rivers, Vipingo (possibly divided up further), Uganda, JVs, etc.

Then they have fully owned (obviously unlisted) firms e.g. Nabo which acts as Centum's money manager.
Part ownership in unlisted Isuzu, ACE/Sabis, Sidian, etc.

Listed firms like Longhorn.

Centum can choose to completely or partially exit any of these though for now listing doesn't seem the way to go!
Greedy when others are fearful. Very fearful when others are greedy - to paraphrase Warren Buffett
Mike Ock
#33 Posted : Saturday, February 20, 2021 8:31:09 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 1/22/2015
Posts: 681
What happened to this? After all the hullabaloo the company still isn't available on any broker...
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