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Jeremiah Kiereini
kawi254
#21 Posted : Tuesday, May 14, 2019 10:27:50 PM
Rank: Member


Joined: 2/20/2015
Posts: 295
Location: Nairobi
Why is it that these Makerere people (Kibaki, Mwiraria, Kiereini) always came back to marry their village gacungwas after being exposed globally?...and the way the Baganda ladies are to die for? Akina Kibaki didn't even sow some wild seeds in Kampala?
FRM2011
#22 Posted : Tuesday, May 14, 2019 10:30:29 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 11/5/2010
Posts: 2,276
2012 wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
hardwood wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
Fyatu wrote:
Kenyan golden generation looses one of its members...RIP Mzee Jeremiah

These Alliance-Makerere-Oxford axis fellas really enjoyed life when they were at their prime and made serious money while at it. They also led quite thrifty lifestyles bordering on tight-wad-ness(from the word tightwad)



Golden ???

At the height of the maumau crackdown, the colonial police did their interrogation using sadistic levels of torture at Manyani and other detention centers.

They used to be accompanied by a young kikuyu who would do the translation.

His name was Jeremiah Kiereini.

I only hope this mother****er suffered properly before he died.


He was just doing his job. Nothing wrong.



I am reading disturbing stuff online.

Apparently, kiereini was promoted to deputy commander mwea detention camp. He was sadistic in torturing the detainees there to gain approval from the white commander.

I am delighted to learn this homeguard has buried his two sons before leaving earth. His last days must have been terrible.


Sounds like it's personal for you.

But I agree that sadly these people who were on the wrong side of history at the time seem to have emerged better rewarded than the rest.


It is personal. My grandpa served 7 years in Manyani. The same thugs would later steal his sweat as a coffee and dairy farmer.

BTW, Kiereini used to be accompanied by Magana Kenyatta for the interrogation sessions at Manyani.
kaka2za
#23 Posted : Tuesday, May 14, 2019 11:34:03 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 10/3/2008
Posts: 3,435
Location: Gwitu
FRM2011 wrote:
2012 wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
hardwood wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
Fyatu wrote:
Kenyan golden generation looses one of its members...RIP Mzee Jeremiah

These Alliance-Makerere-Oxford axis fellas really enjoyed life when they were at their prime and made serious money while at it. They also led quite thrifty lifestyles bordering on tight-wad-ness(from the word tightwad)



Golden ???

At the height of the maumau crackdown, the colonial police did their interrogation using sadistic levels of torture at Manyani and other detention centers.

They used to be accompanied by a young kikuyu who would do the translation.

His name was Jeremiah Kiereini.

I only hope this mother****er suffered properly before he died.


He was just doing his job. Nothing wrong.



I am reading disturbing stuff online.

Apparently, kiereini was promoted to deputy commander mwea detention camp. He was sadistic in torturing the detainees there to gain approval from the white commander.

I am delighted to learn this homeguard has buried his two sons before leaving earth. His last days must have been terrible.


Sounds like it's personal for you.

But I agree that sadly these people who were on the wrong side of history at the time seem to have emerged better rewarded than the rest.


It is personal. My grandpa served 7 years in Manyani. The same thugs would later steal his sweat as a coffee and dairy farmer.

BTW, Kiereini used to be accompanied by Magana Kenyatta for the interrogation sessions at Manyani.


Most homeguards made money but were never happy. Their families are now wrangling over ill-gotten wealth.
Their generations will suffer e.g Matiba who paid for his father's sins.
simonkabz
#24 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 12:28:46 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/2/2007
Posts: 8,711
Location: Cameroon
kawi254 wrote:
Why is it that these Makerere people (Kibaki, Mwiraria, Kiereini) always came back to marry their village gacungwas after being exposed globally?...and the way the Baganda ladies are to die for? Akina Kibaki didn't even sow some wild seeds in Kampala?


Not much. Arse and nothing else. You're safer fishing from Muranga.
TULIA.........UFUNZWE!
Lolest!
#25 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 4:51:47 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,441
Location: Kianjokoma
FRM2011 wrote:
2012 wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
hardwood wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
Fyatu wrote:
Kenyan golden generation looses one of its members...RIP Mzee Jeremiah

These Alliance-Makerere-Oxford axis fellas really enjoyed life when they were at their prime and made serious money while at it. They also led quite thrifty lifestyles bordering on tight-wad-ness(from the word tightwad)



Golden ???

At the height of the maumau crackdown, the colonial police did their interrogation using sadistic levels of torture at Manyani and other detention centers.

They used to be accompanied by a young kikuyu who would do the translation.

His name was Jeremiah Kiereini.

I only hope this mother****er suffered properly before he died.


He was just doing his job. Nothing wrong.



I am reading disturbing stuff online.

Apparently, kiereini was promoted to deputy commander mwea detention camp. He was sadistic in torturing the detainees there to gain approval from the white commander.

I am delighted to learn this homeguard has buried his two sons before leaving earth. His last days must have been terrible.


Sounds like it's personal for you.

But I agree that sadly these people who were on the wrong side of history at the time seem to have emerged better rewarded than the rest.


It is personal. My grandpa served 7 years in Manyani. The same thugs would later steal his sweat as a coffee and dairy farmer.

BTW, Kiereini used to be accompanied by Magana Kenyatta for the interrogation sessions at Manyani.

Was Kiereini really at Manyani?d'oh! Thought he was only at Gathigiriri

The most brutal and most feared African confession extraction officer was former Nyeri Town MP Isaiah Mwai Mathenge.
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
T-Bag
#26 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 8:25:31 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 9/25/2008
Posts: 399
Flo-ology wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
Fyatu wrote:
Kenyan golden generation looses one of its members...RIP Mzee Jeremiah

These Alliance-Makerere-Oxford axis fellas really enjoyed life when they were at their prime and made serious money while at it. They also led quite thrifty lifestyles bordering on tight-wad-ness(from the word tightwad)



Golden ???

At the height of the maumau crackdown, the colonial police did their interrogation using sadistic levels of torture at Manyani and other detention centers.

They used to be accompanied by a young kikuyu who would do the translation.

His name was Jeremiah Kiereini.

I only hope this mother****er suffered properly before he died.


Damn! Kumbe malipo ni hapa hapa duniani. Having read nasty things about this guy and reflecting on what happened to others like Kones family I can say that that Swahili saying has a deep meaning


I cannot authenticate the evil that this homeguard did to the black africans but this guy was a venomous human being..(in kiswahili we say mtu roho mbaya)....I knew some of his business transactions......looted corporates....and stashed cash all over the place.... give it a few months....succession drama shall ensue...when some guy unfairly takes advantage of you, lock yourself in the toilet and cry......properly.. make sure you make it very emotional.....visualize your children suffering and such thoughts.... This stuff works.....
I AM trust in GOD, I AM belief in THYSELF
heri
#27 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 8:56:24 AM
Rank: Member


Joined: 9/14/2011
Posts: 665
Location: nairobi
FRM2011 wrote:
2012 wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
hardwood wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
Fyatu wrote:
Kenyan golden generation looses one of its members...RIP Mzee Jeremiah

These Alliance-Makerere-Oxford axis fellas really enjoyed life when they were at their prime and made serious money while at it. They also led quite thrifty lifestyles bordering on tight-wad-ness(from the word tightwad)



Golden ???

At the height of the maumau crackdown, the colonial police did their interrogation using sadistic levels of torture at Manyani and other detention centers.

They used to be accompanied by a young kikuyu who would do the translation.

His name was Jeremiah Kiereini.

I only hope this mother****er suffered properly before he died.


He was just doing his job. Nothing wrong.



I am reading disturbing stuff online.

Apparently, kiereini was promoted to deputy commander mwea detention camp. He was sadistic in torturing the detainees there to gain approval from the white commander.

I am delighted to learn this homeguard has buried his two sons before leaving earth. His last days must have been terrible.


Sounds like it's personal for you.

But I agree that sadly these people who were on the wrong side of history at the time seem to have emerged better rewarded than the rest.


It is personal. My grandpa served 7 years in Manyani. The same thugs would later steal his sweat as a coffee and dairy farmer.

BTW, Kiereini used to be accompanied by Magana Kenyatta for the interrogation sessions at Manyani.


Yes. It was really bad what these people did. Anyone who has not read these two book should read them

1) Britain's Gulag: The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya
2) Histories of the Hanged: Britain's Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire

You will really be mad to know what happened to our Grandfathers and Grandmothers and the role the home guards played


Lolest!
#28 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 9:04:42 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,441
Location: Kianjokoma
Ex-CMC shareholders haven't forgotten what happened a few years back
Quote:
I cannot authenticate the evil that this homeguard did to the black africans but this guy was a venomous human being..(in kiswahili we say mtu roho mbaya)....I knew some of his business transactions......looted corporates....and stashed cash all over the place.... give it a few months....succession drama shall ensue...when some guy unfairly takes advantage of you, lock yourself in the toilet and cry......properly.. make sure you make it very emotional.....visualize your children suffering and such thoughts.... This stuff works....
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
Lolest!
#29 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 9:31:34 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,441
Location: Kianjokoma
Quote:
Yes. It was really bad what these people did. Anyone who has not read these two book should read them

1) Britain's Gulag: The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya
2) Histories of the Hanged: Britain's Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire

You will really be mad to know what happened to our Grandfathers and Grandmothers and the role the home guards played


I read Britain's Gulag first. That's the book that fingers Kiereini & Isaiah Mathenge.

I then bought Kiereini's memoirs. Because of curiosity raised by Elkins. He admits he was a rehab officer in Mwea but denies that he was involved in extracting confessions(by torture). He says the role of rehabilitation officers was more of counselling & faults Elkins for not seeking his side of the story.

He goes on to say how he was posted to Meru as a DO after the emergency and says he enjoy good relations with locals there many whom were detainees in Mwea.

Well, that left me confused. Maybe he was just writing to clean his image. Or maybe not. What I liked about his account of the emergency era is that he is the first Gikuyu to admit he was against the Mau Mau and give reasons for his opposition.

All other Kikuyu memoirs either are quiet concerning their allegiance(e.g Matiba, Maathai), or claim to have taken the oath or were part of 'sleeper cells'/supply wing(Karume, Gatu)
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
tycho
#30 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 9:59:22 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/1/2011
Posts: 8,386
Location: Nairobi
Lolest! wrote:
Quote:
Yes. It was really bad what these people did. Anyone who has not read these two book should read them

1) Britain's Gulag: The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya
2) Histories of the Hanged: Britain's Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire

You will really be mad to know what happened to our Grandfathers and Grandmothers and the role the home guards played


I read Britain's Gulag first. That's the book that fingers Kiereini & Isaiah Mathenge.

I then bought Kiereini's memoirs. Because of curiosity raised by Elkins. He admits he was a rehab officer in Mwea but denies that he was involved in extracting confessions(by torture). He says the role of rehabilitation officers was more of counselling & faults Elkins for not seeking his side of the story.

He goes on to say how he was posted to Meru as a DO after the emergency and says he enjoy good relations with locals there many whom were detainees in Mwea.

Well, that left me confused. Maybe he was just writing to clean his image. Or maybe not. What I liked about his account of the emergency era is that he is the first Gikuyu to admit he was against the Mau Mau and give reasons for his opposition.

All other Kikuyu memoirs either are quiet concerning their allegiance(e.g Matiba, Maathai), or claim to have taken the oath or were part of 'sleeper cells'/supply wing(Karume, Gatu)


Truth is always slippery even when we give each side a hearing. But one could never become a DO without being a sellout and selling out always involved being ruthless to the mau mau opposition.

At the moment, if you are middle class odds are that you are of collaboration stock.

It's like as @hardwood says, 'we are just doing our job. To survive and feel good about ourselves.'

Kiereini must have felt so good about himself...
hardwood
#31 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 10:15:13 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/28/2015
Posts: 8,675
heri wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
2012 wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
hardwood wrote:
FRM2011 wrote:
Fyatu wrote:
Kenyan golden generation looses one of its members...RIP Mzee Jeremiah

These Alliance-Makerere-Oxford axis fellas really enjoyed life when they were at their prime and made serious money while at it. They also led quite thrifty lifestyles bordering on tight-wad-ness(from the word tightwad)



Golden ???

At the height of the maumau crackdown, the colonial police did their interrogation using sadistic levels of torture at Manyani and other detention centers.

They used to be accompanied by a young kikuyu who would do the translation.

His name was Jeremiah Kiereini.

I only hope this mother****er suffered properly before he died.


He was just doing his job. Nothing wrong.



I am reading disturbing stuff online.

Apparently, kiereini was promoted to deputy commander mwea detention camp. He was sadistic in torturing the detainees there to gain approval from the white commander.

I am delighted to learn this homeguard has buried his two sons before leaving earth. His last days must have been terrible.


Sounds like it's personal for you.

But I agree that sadly these people who were on the wrong side of history at the time seem to have emerged better rewarded than the rest.


It is personal. My grandpa served 7 years in Manyani. The same thugs would later steal his sweat as a coffee and dairy farmer.

BTW, Kiereini used to be accompanied by Magana Kenyatta for the interrogation sessions at Manyani.


Yes. It was really bad what these people did. Anyone who has not read these two book should read them

1) Britain's Gulag: The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya
2) Histories of the Hanged: Britain's Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire

You will really be mad to know what happened to our Grandfathers and Grandmothers and the role the home guards played




Why have you left out the fact that the native colonial police officers that terrorized your grandparents were drawn from the loyal akamba, luo, luhya, and kipsigis and nandi communities because kikuyus were thought to be treacherous and couldn't be trusted and thus were very few in the police force? Read this article:

https://www.jstor.org/st...#page_scan_tab_contents

Quote:
One of the most significant questions on the recruitment of Africans
into the colonial Kenya police, and at the same time one of the most difficult to
answer, is whether the British recruitment process was influenced by a
tribal bias. Although some groups were proportionally overrepresented
and others underrepresented, there is little solid data as to why. Without
doubt, the British were very conscious of differences, real or imagined,
among the peoples of Kenya Colony and Protectorate. J. H. Patterson
was not atypical when in the early days of British East Africa he commented that, "The Wa Kikuyu have a reputation of being treacherous people" and the Kavarondo (Luo, and Luhya) were "industrious, simple people ... on the whole about the best of the African
tribes. In the Kenya police there were few Kikuyu and many Luo,
Luhya, and Kamba; the latter three groups in fact were said to be the
"backbone of the force." In the 1920s Commissioner Roy G. B. Spicer
noted that the Kamba responded to any call for recruits in "a huge number," and that the force was becoming "overburdened" with "Kavarondo."
The question of literacy also became an important consideration in the
recruitment of African constables. While African police were paid bonuses if they were literate in English, Kiswahili, or one of several other
indigeous languages, there was by 1926 a suspicion of the literate recruit. A decade later the annual report stated that there was
a concerted effort being made to recruit "suitable Africans from, the more
backward tribes of the Colony." A 1942 report revealed that the evidence indicated that the illiterate made a better policeman than did the
literate African, and that "the policy of recruiting literates should be pursued with great caution." By 1949 the annual report showed that illiterate recruits and "the best material" were mostly from the martial Kipsigis
and Nandi and the reliable Kamba; literates were primarily Luo, Kikuyu,
and Kamba. The police commissioner went on to state that the uneducated had greater qualities of reliability, manliness, sense of responsibility,
and discipline, while educated young Africans were, unwilling to start at
the bottom and expected preferential treatment within the force. By 1953, the composition of the colonial police force was: Kamba 18%, Luo 11%, Luhya 10%, Nandi 10%, Kipsigis 8%, Kikuyu 2%, Masai 1%

Lolest!
#32 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 10:48:20 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,441
Location: Kianjokoma
tycho wrote:


Truth is always slippery even when we give each side a hearing. But one could never become a DO without being a sellout and selling out always involved being ruthless to the mau mau opposition.

At the moment, if you are middle class odds are that you are of collaboration stock.

It's like as @hardwood says, 'we are just doing our job. To survive and feel good about ourselves.'

Kiereini must have felt so good about himself...

I find Anderson's Histories of the Hanged as perhaps the most dispassionate, truthful & fair account.

Anderson tells us that there were 3 groups opposed to the war among the Agikuyu, Aembu & Ameru:
1. Christians-Devout Christians were opposed to oathing as it contradicted Christian teachings. The Catholic church recognised some who were killed by Mau Mau in Nyeri as martyrs.
2.People already in power-Chiefs, administrators.
3.Traditionalists-Devout traditionalists considered this oathing led by young men as a subversion normal oathing.
I was reading juzi how even the Njuri Ncheke had condemned Mau Mau!

This thing wasn't as easy to dichotomise as we do today. Most were perhaps opposed to the fighting but were for greater independence.
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
Lolest!
#33 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 11:06:08 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,441
Location: Kianjokoma
hardwood wrote:


Why have you left out the fact that the native colonial police officers that terrorized your grandparents were drawn from the loyal akamba, luo, luhya, and kipsigis and nandi communities because kikuyus were thought to be treacherous and couldn't be trusted and thus were very few in the police force? Read this article:

https://www.jstor.org/st...#page_scan_tab_contents

Quote:
One of the most significant questions on the recruitment of Africans
into the colonial Kenya police, and at the same time one of the most difficult to
answer, is whether the British recruitment process was influenced by a
tribal bias. Although some groups were proportionally overrepresented
and others underrepresented, there is little solid data as to why. Without
doubt, the British were very conscious of differences, real or imagined,
among the peoples of Kenya Colony and Protectorate. J. H. Patterson
was not atypical when in the early days of British East Africa he commented that, "The Wa Kikuyu have a reputation of being treacherous people" and the Kavarondo (Luo, and Luhya) were "industrious, simple people ... on the whole about the best of the African
tribes. In the Kenya police there were few Kikuyu and many Luo,
Luhya, and Kamba; the latter three groups in fact were said to be the
"backbone of the force." In the 1920s Commissioner Roy G. B. Spicer
noted that the Kamba responded to any call for recruits in "a huge number," and that the force was becoming "overburdened" with "Kavarondo."
The question of literacy also became an important consideration in the
recruitment of African constables. While African police were paid bonuses if they were literate in English, Kiswahili, or one of several other
indigeous languages, there was by 1926 a suspicion of the literate recruit. A decade later the annual report stated that there was
a concerted effort being made to recruit "suitable Africans from, the more
backward tribes of the Colony." A 1942 report revealed that the evidence indicated that the illiterate made a better policeman than did the
literate African, and that "the policy of recruiting literates should be pursued with great caution." By 1949 the annual report showed that illiterate recruits and "the best material" were mostly from the martial Kipsigis
and Nandi and the reliable Kamba; literates were primarily Luo, Kikuyu,
and Kamba. The police commissioner went on to state that the uneducated had greater qualities of reliability, manliness, sense of responsibility,
and discipline, while educated young Africans were, unwilling to start at
the bottom and expected preferential treatment within the force. By 1953, the composition of the colonial police force was: Kamba 18%, Luo 11%, Luhya 10%, Nandi 10%, Kipsigis 8%, Kikuyu 2%, Masai 1%


Thanks for bringing this upApplause Applause Applause Applause

I've always wondered, now that we're always told of chiefs like Waruhiu & Nderi, didn't other areas have chiefs?

Duncan Ndegwa writes bitterly about the willingness of 'brothers' to serve in the colonial crushing force.
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
Fyatu
#34 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 11:23:12 AM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 1/20/2011
Posts: 1,402
Location: Nakuru
My grandfather was also at manyani and became a stone mason as a consequence of his kifungo cha miaka kumi(1952-1962), five strokes of the cane and kazi ngumu ya kuchonga mawe.He later became a mwimboko performer to make ends meet and educate his children. My grandmother was condemned to king'ong'o and my father was delivered there. Indeed, my father served his first 5 years of life as a toddler in this world as an inmate in king'ong'o.

The day my grandmother narrated this story to me as a warning(at that time, i used to dalliance with mungiki huko Naikuru,Dandora,Mwiki na githurai) i wept uncontrollably and promised her not to dalliance with jamaa and sniff tobacco ever again.

Which begs the question...who killed Field Marshall Baimungi?

@FRM....might you know anything about Baimungi and the MauMau who remained in the forests?
Dumb money becomes dumb only when it listens to smart money
wukan
#35 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 11:47:39 AM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 11/13/2015
Posts: 1,088
Lolest! wrote:
tycho wrote:


Truth is always slippery even when we give each side a hearing. But one could never become a DO without being a sellout and selling out always involved being ruthless to the mau mau opposition.

At the moment, if you are middle class odds are that you are of collaboration stock.

It's like as @hardwood says, 'we are just doing our job. To survive and feel good about ourselves.'

Kiereini must have felt so good about himself...

I find Anderson's Histories of the Hanged as perhaps the most dispassionate, truthful & fair account.

Anderson tells us that there were 3 groups opposed to the war among the Agikuyu, Aembu & Ameru:
1. Christians-Devout Christians were opposed to oathing as it contradicted Christian teachings. The Catholic church recognised some who were killed by Mau Mau in Nyeri as martyrs.
2.People already in power-Chiefs, administrators.
3.Traditionalists-Devout traditionalists considered this oathing led by young men as a subversion normal oathing.
I was reading juzi how even the Njuri Ncheke had condemned Mau Mau!

This thing wasn't as easy to dichotomise as we do today. Most were perhaps opposed to the fighting but were for greater independence.


There was also the issue of that Kikuyu had an emerging hierarchical social class system very much similar to what the British had. The lowest rank was the ‘Ahoi’ landless class(‘massuferer’). Majority of the mau mau were those who were dispossessed of land in their ancestral home (especially Kiambu). They automatically became the “ahoi” which is why the fight was personal for them. Even Dedan Kimathi and Gen. China who were fairly educated had a difficult time controlling some of the fighters. Owning land conferred a class right which explains our unhealthy obsession with plot ownership.

In the end the mau mau rebellion ended up being a peasant uprising. Peasant uprisings have never been successful even in Britain. To prevent another peasant uprising the British deliberately created a middle class rank among the Africans before they departed and created on them privilege including giving funds for land resettlement and middle class housing. Perhaps if the British had created an African middle class much earlier then the issue of independence would have been moot. Part of the reason why I think revolutions can never work in Kenya those in privilege would never want to join the ‘massuferer’

Kiereini and that group that came after independence did a much better job than in most African countries creating a much stronger state. Unfortunately they never reformed the system to allow enough people have a chance to improve their social status in their lifetime through hard work. After all they inherited the white privilege.

Lolest!
#36 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 11:50:35 AM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 3/18/2011
Posts: 11,441
Location: Kianjokoma
Quote:
Which begs the question...who killed Field Marshall Baimungi?

@FRM....might you know anything about Baimungi and the MauMau who remained in the forests?

He was killed by the post independence Jomo Kenyatta govt. It is said he had gone back to the forest(to fight)

Other accounts point to rivalry between him and Meru king Angaine
Quote:
According to Baimungi’s wife, Muthoni, the Field Marshal and his soldiers heeded the call and left the forest with their firearms.

They were welcomed at Kinoru Stadium in Meru Town by then Lands minister Jackson Angaine and fellow Cabinet minister Mbiyu Koinange.

President Kenyatta later invited Field Marshal Baimungi to his Gatundu home and rewarded him with 10,000 acres of land at Timau in Meru.

Baimungi in turn gave his whip made of rhino skin to the President. In exchange the President gave him a pistol and six bullets, claiming “a man should not be empty handed”.

He also gave him a Land Rover KFF 660 and seven national flags, one for his vehicle, another for himself and others for his five generals.

On leaving Gatundu, Muthoni says, Baimungi and his soldiers camped at a farm in Nthimbiri waiting to be given land as promised by the President.

Later they moved to Nkando ya Nkoma Forest where they stayed for six months, but still, the president’s order was not fulfilled, according to Ms Muthoni and Ms Wanjuru.

They say instead, Mr Angaine demanded back flags given by the President from Baimungi, but he declined. Mr Angaine alleged that the flags were being misused.

On January 26, 1965, Baimungi was killed allegedly by government agents, alongside two of his soldiers.

“They killed Baimungi and his fellow soldiers, saying they had ignored Mzee Jomo Kenyatta’s order to move out of the forest,” laments Ms Muthoni.

“Those were false allegations since he had surrendered his firearms at Kinoru Stadium on December 27, 1963,” she insists.
Laughing out loudly smile Applause d'oh! Sad Drool Liar Shame on you Pray
Fyatu
#37 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 12:23:42 PM
Rank: Veteran


Joined: 1/20/2011
Posts: 1,402
Location: Nakuru
Lolest! wrote:
Quote:
Which begs the question...who killed Field Marshall Baimungi?

@FRM....might you know anything about Baimungi and the MauMau who remained in the forests?

He was killed by the post independence Jomo Kenyatta govt. It is said he had gone back to the forest(to fight)

Other accounts point to rivalry between him and Meru king Angaine
Quote:
According to Baimungi’s wife, Muthoni, the Field Marshal and his soldiers heeded the call and left the forest with their firearms.

They were welcomed at Kinoru Stadium in Meru Town by then Lands minister Jackson Angaine and fellow Cabinet minister Mbiyu Koinange.

President Kenyatta later invited Field Marshal Baimungi to his Gatundu home and rewarded him with 10,000 acres of land at Timau in Meru.

Baimungi in turn gave his whip made of rhino skin to the President. In exchange the President gave him a pistol and six bullets, claiming “a man should not be empty handed”.

He also gave him a Land Rover KFF 660 and seven national flags, one for his vehicle, another for himself and others for his five generals.

On leaving Gatundu, Muthoni says, Baimungi and his soldiers camped at a farm in Nthimbiri waiting to be given land as promised by the President.

Later they moved to Nkando ya Nkoma Forest where they stayed for six months, but still, the president’s order was not fulfilled, according to Ms Muthoni and Ms Wanjuru.

They say instead, Mr Angaine demanded back flags given by the President from Baimungi, but he declined. Mr Angaine alleged that the flags were being misused.

On January 26, 1965, Baimungi was killed allegedly by government agents, alongside two of his soldiers.

“They killed Baimungi and his fellow soldiers, saying they had ignored Mzee Jomo Kenyatta’s order to move out of the forest,” laments Ms Muthoni.

“Those were false allegations since he had surrendered his firearms at Kinoru Stadium on December 27, 1963,” she insists.


Sorry to bring Raila's name into this debate....I know my buddy @AA will not be pleased for dragging Baba's name everywhere

Anyway, this is the sole reason why i used to fault Baba when he used to speak of historical injustices and conveniently forget about Baimungi and scores of other MauMau who suffered great injustices.

The debate about historical injustices has always been skewed to look as if Okuyos(GEMA) have victimized everybody else in this nation yet they are victims themselves who are also waiting to receive reparations for over 100yrs of forceful eviction, massacre, rape, arson, plunder etc. I am not saying other communities have not suffered. However, what i am saying is that when debating historical injustice "these people" should not always be viewed as villains...ama namna gani?



Dumb money becomes dumb only when it listens to smart money
tycho
#38 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 4:43:44 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/1/2011
Posts: 8,386
Location: Nairobi
@Lolest. At the moment I believe that the qualification you give to the 'Histories of the hanged' may not be the necessary qualifications for a historian, for the historian is always biased towards the requirements of the people who need the history. Maybe we need to view these accounts from a biased perspective...

I am interested in your supposition that most Kenyanized Africans were against the mau mau struggle but were for independence. The first idea that comes to mind is that of the role of traditional prophets and leaders in shaping the attitude of 'natives'. If assertions to the effect that Africans were advised to cooperate with the new comers, then it's probable that there was an air of indifference regarding independence.

The disappearance of traditional leadership may have caused the Kenyanized African to lack an authority to guide him on next moves...

Hence the power exerted by Jomo Kenyatta and his claim for traditional power and assertion for independence that began with blessings for the mau mau....
tycho
#39 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 4:50:53 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/1/2011
Posts: 8,386
Location: Nairobi
The question of historical injustices is tricky and perhaps very difficult to negotiate. All ethnic groups suffered, yet the British also suffered. I think what happened in Kenya is mostly what happened in Britain in the 16th and 17th centuries. How can we deal with such facts?

Do we have a historical ideal that ought to have been followed that was in fact avoided? Which ideal is this?

Perhaps we should say that history happens as it should and that no injustices exist?
Kusadikika
#40 Posted : Wednesday, May 15, 2019 5:20:21 PM
Rank: Elder


Joined: 7/22/2008
Posts: 2,365
tycho wrote:
The question of historical injustices is tricky and perhaps very difficult to negotiate. All ethnic groups suffered, yet the British also suffered. I think what happened in Kenya is mostly what happened in Britain in the 16th and 17th centuries. How can we deal with such facts?

Do we have a historical ideal that ought to have been followed that was in fact avoided? Which ideal is this?

Perhaps we should say that history happens as it should and that no injustices exist?


I would say very dangerous and impossible to negotiate.

Check out this essay by Thomas Sowell:

https://www.hoover.org/r...ch/quest-cosmic-justice
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